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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 2,200 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

125 results

The primary factor in estimating fire danger is fuel moisture. Fuel moisture varies seasonally and should be measured over an entire fire season using remote sensing technologies and verified using ground measurements. Recent advances in spaceborne and airborne imaging systems can potentially significantly improve the ability to...
Author(s): Jennifer L. Rechel, Dar A. Roberts
Year Published: 2005
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Landscape fragmentation can affect fuel accumulation, increase the spatial variability of fuel loads, and affect the susceptibility of forests to fire. Fragmentation creates a complex environment in which to manage forests in the United States and Puerto Rico and few studies have related the combined effects of fragmentation,...
Author(s): William A. Gould, Grizelle Gonzalez, Andrew T. Hudak
Year Published: 2005
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Canopy bulk density (CBD) is an important crown characteristic needed to predict crown fire spread, yet it is difficult to measure in the field. Presented here is a comprehensive research effort to evaluate six indirect sampling techniques for estimating CBD. As reference data, detailed crown fuel biomass measurements were taken on...
Author(s): Robert E. Keane, Elizabeth D. Reinhardt, Joe H. Scott, Kathy L. Gray, James J. Reardon
Year Published: 2005
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
This assessment characterizes, at a regional scale, forest biomass that can potentially be removed to implement the fuel reduction and ecosystem restoration objectives of the National Fire Plan for the Western United States. The assessment area covers forests on both public and private ownerships in the region and describes all...
Author(s): Robert B. Rummer, Jeffrey P. Prestemon, Dennis May, Patrick D. Miles, John Vissage, Ronald E. McRoberts, Greg C. Liknes, Wayne D. Shepperd, Dennis E. Ferguson, William J. Elliot, I. Sue Miller, Stephen E. Reutebuch, R. James Barbour, Jeremy S. Fried, Bryce J. Stokes, Edward M. Bilek, Kenneth E. Skog
Year Published: 2005
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Summary of Findings: (1) Satellite imagery has the potential to map fuel models at the national and local levels: (a) Landsat. The Landfire project has shown that Landsat 7 (ETM+) data are useful for mapping fuels at the national level. Critical to developing accurate maps are data collected in the field on fuels and vegetation. At...
Author(s): Jan W. van Wagtendonk, Ralph Root, Carl H. Key
Year Published: 2005
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Land managers need cost-effective methods for mapping and characterizing fire fuels quickly and accurately. The advent of sensors with increased spatial resolution may improve the accuracy and reduce the cost of fuels mapping. The objective of this research is to evaluate the accuracy and utility of imagery from the Advanced...
Author(s): Michael J. Falkowski
Year Published: 2004
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
Land managers need cost-effective methods for mapping and characterizing fire fuels quickly and accurately. The advent of sensors with increased spatial resolution may improve the accuracy and reduce the cost of fuels mapping. The objective of this research is to evaluate the accuracy and utility of imagery from the Advanced...
Author(s): Michael J. Falkowski, Paul E. Gessler, Penelope Morgan, Alistair M. S. Smith, Andrew T. Hudak
Year Published: 2004
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
The principal goals of fuel treatments are to reduce fireline intensities, reduce the potential for crown fires, improve opportunities for successful fire suppression, and improve forest resilience to forest fires. This fact sheet discusses thinning, and surface fuel treatments, as well as challenges associated with those treatments...
Author(s): Morris C. Johnson
Year Published: 2004
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
The amount of science applicable to the management of wildfire hazards is increasing daily. In addition, the attitudes of landowners and policymakers about fire and fuels management are changing. This fact sheet discusses three critical keys to communicating about wildfire hazards.
Author(s): Dennis Mileti
Year Published: 2004
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
In 1999, a coarse-scale map of Fire Regime Condition Classes (FRCC) was developed for the conterminous United States (US) to help address contemporary fire management issues and to quantify changes in fuels from historical conditions. This map and its associated data have been incorporated into national policies (National Fire Plan...
Author(s): James P. Menakis, Melanie Miller, Thomas Thompson
Year Published: 2004
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings

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