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Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

 

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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 2,100 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

285 results

Finding novel ways to plan and implement landscape-level forest treatments that protect sensitive wildlife and other key ecosystem components, while also reducing the risk of large-scale, high-severity fires, can prove to be difficult. We examined alternative approaches to landscape-scale fuel-treatment design for the same landscape...
Author(s): Christopher B. Dow, Brandon M. Collins, Scott L. Stephens
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
In Montana, USA, there are substantial opportunities for mechanized thinning treatments on public forests to reduce the likelihood of severe and damaging wildfires and improve forest health. These treatments produce residues that can be used to generate renewable energy and displace fossil fuels. The choice modeling method is...
Author(s): Tyron J. Venn, Nathaniel Anderson, Robert M. Campbell
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Emissions from burning piles of post-harvest timber slash (Douglas-fir) in Grande Ronde, Oregon were sampled using an instrument platform lofted into the plume using a tether-controlled aerostat or balloon. Emissions of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, particulate matter (PM2.5), black carbon, ultraviolet absorbing PM,...
Author(s): Johanna Aurell, Brian K. Gullett, Dennis Tabor, Nick Yonker
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Prescribed fire is applied widely as a management tool in North America to meet various objectives such as reducing fuel loads and fuel continuity, returning fire to an ecosystem, enhancing wildlife habitats, improving forage, preparing seedbeds, improving watershed conditions, enhancing nutrient cycling, ...
Author(s): William M. Block, L. Mike Conner, Paul A. Brewer, Paulette Ford, Jonathan Haufler, Andrea Litt, Ronald E. Masters, Laura R. Mitchell, Jane Park
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
In the United States, fuel reduction treatments are a standard land management tool to restore the structure and composition of forests that have been degraded by past management. Although treatments can have multiple purposes, their principal objective is to create landscape conditions where wildland fire can be safely managed to...
Author(s): Kevin M. Barnett, Sean A. Parks, Carol L. Miller, Helen T. Naughton
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Mastication of standing trees to reduce crown fuel loading is an increasingly popular method of reducing wildfire hazard in the wildland-urban interface of Canada. Previous research has shown that masticated fuel beds can leave considerable pyrogenic and black carbon residuals after burning, though the impact of fuel particle size...
Author(s): Dan K. Thompson, Tom J. Schiks, B. Mike Wotton
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The prevailing paradigm in the western U.S. is that the increase in stand-replacing wildfires in historically frequent-fire dry forests is due to unnatural fuel loads that have resulted from management activities including fire suppression, logging, and grazing, combined with more severe drought conditions and increasing...
Author(s): Elizabeth L. Kalies, Larissa L. Yocom Kent
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article, Synthesis
The Interagency Fuels Treatment Decision Support System (IFTDSS) is a web-based software and data integration framework that organizes fire and fuels software applications into a single online application. IFTDSS is designed to make fuels treatment planning and analysis more efficient and ...
Author(s): Stacy Drury, H. Michael Rauscher, Erin M. Banwell, Shih Ming Huang, Tami L. Lavezzo
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Every year wildland fires affect much more acreage in the United States compared to controlled burns. Like controlled burns, wildland fire can help promote biological diversity and healthy ecosystems. But despite these facts, wildland fire is not often considered as a fuel treatment in the United States. Scientists working with the...
Author(s): Brian Cooke
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
Fire frequency in low-elevation coniferous forests in western North America has greatly declined since the late 1800s. In many areas, this has increased tree density and the proportion of shade-tolerant species, reduced resource availability, and increased forest susceptibility to forest insect pests and high-severity wildfire. In...
Author(s): Sharon M. Hood, Stephen P. Baker, Anna Sala
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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