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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 2,200 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

137 results

Across the western United States, the three primary drivers of tree mortality and carbon balance are bark beetles, timber harvest, and wildfire. While these agents of forest change frequently overlap, uncertainty remains regarding their interactions and influence on specific subsequent fire effects such as change in canopy cover....
Author(s): T. Ryan McCarley, Crystal A. Kolden, Nicole M. Vaillant, Andrew T. Hudak, Alistair M. S. Smith, Jason Kreitler
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The pine forests in the southern portion of the Rocky Mountains are a heterogeneous mosaic of disturbance and recovery. The most extensive and intensive stress and mortality are received from human activity, fire, and mountain pine beetles (MPB; Dendroctonus ponderosae). Understanding disturbance interactions and disturbance-...
Author(s): Lu Liang, Todd J. Hawbaker, Zhiliang Zhu, Xuecao Li, Peng Gong
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Future forests are being shaped by changing climate and disturbances. Climate change is causing large-scale forest declines globally, in addition to distributional shifts of many tree species. Because environmental cues dictate insect seasonality and population success, climate change is also influencing tree-killing bark beetles....
Author(s): Barbara J. Bentz, Jacob P. Duncan, James A. Powell
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) has the largest and most northerly distribution of any white pine (Subgenus Strobus) in North America, encompassing 18° latitude and 21° longitude in western mountains. Within this broad range, however, whitebark pine occurs within a narrow elevational zone, including upper subalpine and treeline...
Author(s): Diana F. Tomback, Lynn M. Resler, Robert E. Keane, Elizabeth R. Pansing, Andrew J. Andrade, Aaron C. Wagner
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Insect outbreaks are major disturbances that affect a land area similar to that of forest fires across North America. The recent mountain pine bark beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreak and its associated blue stain fungi (Grosmannia clavigera) are impacting water partitioning processes of forests in the Rocky Mountain region as...
Author(s): David E. Reed, Brent E. Ewers, Elise G. Pendall, John M. Frank, Robert Kelly
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Understanding the causes and consequences of rapid environmental change is an essential scientific frontier, particularly given the threat of climate- and land use-induced changes in disturbance regimes. In western North America, recent widespread insect outbreaks and wildfires have sparked acute concerns about potential insect–fire...
Author(s): Garrett W. Meigs, Harold S. Zald, John L. Campbell, William S. Keeton, Robert E. Kennedy
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire frequency in low-elevation coniferous forests in western North America has greatly declined since the late 1800s. In many areas, this has increased tree density and the proportion of shade-tolerant species, reduced resource availability, and increased forest susceptibility to forest insect pests and high-severity wildfire. In...
Author(s): Sharon M. Hood, Stephen P. Baker, Anna Sala
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
As part of the Whitebark Pine Ecosystem Foundation’s Annual Science and Management Workshop - Successes and Challenges in Managing the Jewel in the Crown of the Continent, participants saw first hand some of the challenges facing whitebark pine restoration, and they witnessed certification of the first Whitebark Pine Friendly Ski...
Author(s): Corey L. Gucker
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
Whitebark pine plays a prominent role in high elevation ecosystems of the northern Rocky Mountains. It is an important food source for many birds and mammals as well as an essential component of watershed stabilization. Whitebark pine is vanishing from the landscape due to three main factors: white pine blister rust, mountain pine...
Author(s): Signe B. Leirfallom, Robert E. Keane, Molly L. Retzlaff
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
The causes of bark beetle outbreaks - particularly the role of disturbances - are poorly understood. Stand-scale disturbances, like fires, can suddenly improve local host susceptibility and may attract beetles; however, whether such increases can lead to outbreaks in post-disturbance stands is unclear. Using low-density Dendroctonus...
Author(s): Crisia A. Tabacaru, Jane Park, Nadir Erbilgin
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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Research and Publications Database

These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).