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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 2,100 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

97 results

This reference presents general guidelines for planning, implementing, and evaluating whitebark pine conservation and management activities on lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management.
Author(s): Dana L. Perkins, Robert E. Means, Alexia C. Cochrane
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Synthesis, Technical Report or White Paper
Previous research has focused on quantifying fuel loadings and using operational fire behavior models to understand changes in fire severity following MPB outbreaks. In this study however, researchers used direct field measurements taken from the 2012 Pole Creek Fire that burned in lodgepole pine forests in central Oregon’s Eastern...
Author(s): Northwest Fire Science Consortium
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
Forests and trees throughout the world are increasingly affected by factors related to global change. Expanding international trade has facilitated invasions of numerous insects and pathogens into new regions. Many of these invasions have caused substantial forest damage, economic impacts and losses of ecosystem goods and services...
Author(s): T. D. Ramsfield, Barbara J. Bentz, M. Faccoli, H. Jactel, E. G. Brockerhoff
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article, Synthesis
Tree-killing bark beetles are major disturbance agents affecting coniferous forest ecosystems. The role of environmental conditions on driving beetle outbreaks is becoming increasingly important as global climatic change alters environmental factors, such as drought stress, that, in turn, govern tree resistance. Furthermore,...
Author(s): Vlastimil Krivan, Mark Lewis, Barbara J. Bentz, Sharon Bewick, Suzanne M. Lenhart, Andrew Liebhold
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Forests are substantially influenced by disturbances, and therefore accurate information about the location, timing, and magnitude of disturbances is important for understanding effects. In the western United States, the two major disturbance agents that kill trees are wildfire and bark beetle outbreaks. Our objective was to...
Author(s): Jeffrey A. Hicke, Arjan J. H. Meddens, Crystal A. Kolden
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Extensive outbreaks of bark beetles have killed trees across millions of hectares of forests and woodlands in western North America. These outbreaks have led to spirited scientific, public, and policy debates about consequential increases in fire risk, especially in the wildland–urban interface (WUI), where homes and communities are...
Author(s): Dominik Kulakowski, Nathan Mietkiewicz
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfires have increased in western North America, creating extensive areas of regenerating forests. There is concern that recent large, stand-replacing fires will synchronize forest development and commit landscapes to a future of increased disturbance, such as bark beetle outbreaks that require extensive, well-connected forests of...
Author(s): Rupert Seidl, Daniel C. Donato, Kenneth F. Raffa, Monica G. Turner
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Recently, wildfires and prescribed burning have become more frequent in conifer forests of western North America. Most studies examining the impacts of insects on trees with post-fire injury have focused on contributions to tree mortality. Few studies have examined fire-caused injuries to estimate the probability of attack by...
Author(s): Jose F. Negron, Joel D. McMillin, Carolyn Hull Sieg, James F. Fowler, Kurt K. Allen, Linda L. Wadleigh, John A. Anhold, Ken E. Gibson
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Recent large scale mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, MPB) outbreaks have created concern regarding increased fuel loadings and exacerbated fire behavior and have prompted a desire to understand the effects of sequential disturbances on the landscape. However, previous research has focused on quantifying fuel...
Author(s): Michelle Agne, Travis J. Woolley, Stephen A. Fitzgerald
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Where do most of the general public encounter whitebark pines? Ski areas! These recreational areas in high elevations allow many to encounter an otherwise remote and wilderness species. This accessibility of whitebark pines at ski areas serves as the motivation behind the Whitebark Pine Ecosystem Foundation’s...
Author(s): Edie Dooley
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet

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