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Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

 

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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 2,100 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

97 results

Bark beetle-caused tree mortality affects important forest ecosystem processes. Remote sensing methodologies that quantify live and dead basal area (BA) in bark beetle-affected forests can provide valuable information to forest managers and researchers. We compared the utility of light detection and ranging (lidar) and the Landsat-...
Author(s): Benjamin C. Bright, Andrew T. Hudak, Robert E. Kennedy, Arjan J. H. Meddens
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
This document is an assessment of the FS Northern Region's key water resources, tree species, wildlife species, and disturbances, which includes descriptions of the species' current condition, existing stressors, sensitivity to and expected effects of climate changes, and adaptive capacity. 
Author(s): Northern Region Adaptation Partnership
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
The Future Forest Webinar Series facilitated dialogue between scientists and managers about the challenges and opportunities created by the mountain pine beetle (MPB) epidemic. The series consisted of six webinar facilitated by the USFS Rocky Mountain Research Station, the Northern and Rocky Mountain Regions, and the Colorado Forest...
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
The degree to which recent bark beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreaks may influence fire severity and postfire tree regeneration is of heightened interest to resource managers throughout western North America, but empirical data on actual fire effects are lacking. Outcomes may depend on burning conditions (i.e., weather during...
Author(s): Brian J. Harvey, Daniel C. Donato, William H. Romme, Monica G. Turner
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Citizens, government officials, and natural resource managers are greatly concerned about potential impacts of the mountain pine beetle (MPB) epidemic on fire hazards and risk. Some mountain towns are surrounded by dead and dying trees. In the Rocky Mountain Region of the Forest Service, the MPB epidemic threatens over 250,000 acres...
Author(s): Russell A. Parsons, William Matt Jolly, Paul G. Langowski, Megan Matonis, I. Sue Miller
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
Consequences of bark beetle outbreaks for forest wildfire potential are receiving heightened attention, but little research has considered ecosystems with mixed-severity fire regimes. Such forests are widespread, variable in stand structure, and often fuel limited, suggesting that beetle outbreaks could substantially alter fire...
Author(s): Daniel C. Donato, Brian J. Harvey, William H. Romme, Martin Simard, Monica G. Turner
Year Published: 2013
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Bark beetle outbreaks are a major disturbance of forests throughout western North America affecting ecological processes and social and economic values (Amman 1977, Bond and Keeley 2005). Since the 1990s, bark beetle outbreaks have affected between 1.1 and 13.5 million acres in the western United States and an additional 13.5...
Author(s): Chad M. Hoffman, Carolyn Hull Sieg, Penelope Morgan, William E. Mell, Rodman Linn, Camille Stevens-Rumann, Joel D. McMillin, Russell A. Parsons, Helen Maffei
Year Published: 2013
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
As part of the 13th Whitebark Pine Ecosystem Science and Management Workshop - Challenges of Whitebark Pine Restoration, participants visited a whitebark pine restoration area near Fairy Lake in the Bridger Mountains north of Bozeman, MT (Figure 1).The restoration site at about 8,000 feet supports both whitebark pine (Pinus...
Author(s): Corey L. Gucker
Year Published: 2013
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm.) is in serious decline across its range, largely due to the combined effects of Cronartium ribicola J. C. Fisch (an introduced fungal pathogen that causes white pine blister rust), replacement by late successional species, and widespread infestation of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus...
Author(s): Lauren Fins, Ben Hoppus
Year Published: 2013
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Global forests capture and store significant amounts of CO2 through photosynthesis. When carbon is removed from forests through harvest, a portion of the harvested carbon is stored in wood products, often for many decades. The United States Forest Service (USFS) and other agencies are interested in accurately accounting for carbon...
Author(s): Nathaniel Anderson, Jesse Young, Keith Stockmann, Kenneth E. Skog, Sean P. Healey, Dan R. Loeffler, J. Greg Jones, James F. Morrison
Year Published: 2013
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper

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