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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 2,900 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

278 results

Wildfires emit significant amounts of pollutants that degrade air quality. Plumes from three wildfires in the western U.S. were measured from aircraft during the Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) and the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP), both in...
Author(s): Xiaoxi Liu, L. Gregory Huey, Robert J. Yokelson, Vanessa Selimovic, Isobel J. Simpson, Markus Muller, Jose L. Jimenez, Pedro Campuzano-Jost, Andreas J. Beyersdorf, Donald R. Blake, Zachary Butterfield, Yonghoon Choi, John D. Crounse, Douglas A. Day, Glenn S. Diskin, Manvendra K. Dubey, Edward Fortner, Thomas F. Hanisco, Weiwei Hu, Laura E. King, Lawrence Kleinman, Simone Meinardi, Tomas Mikoviny, Timothy B. Onasch, Brett B. Palm, Jeff Peischl, Ilana B. Pollack, Thomas B. Ryerson, Glen W. Sachse, Arthur J. Sedlacek, John E. Shilling, Stephen Springston, Jason M. St. Clair, David J. Tanner, Alexander P. Teng, Paul O. Wennberg, Armin Wisthaler, Glenn M. Wolfe
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Mastication is a wildland fuel treatment technique that is rapidly becoming popular with fire managers for fire hazard reduction projects, especially in areas where reducing fuels with prescribed fire is particularly challenging. Mastication is the process of mechanically modifying the live and dead surface and canopy biomass by...
Author(s): Robert E. Keane, Pamela G. Sikkink, Theresa B. Jain, James J. Reardon
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Interest in PNW forests is shifting from a focus on old-growth forests alone to include the ecological value and processes of early-seral communities. However, focusing on the alpha and omega states of a linear successional model does not account for the suite of conditions derived from mixed-severity fire common in many forests....
Author(s): Christopher J. Dunn, John D. Bailey
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Integration of Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) plot data with Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity (MTBS) data can provide new information about fire effects on forests. This integration allowed broad-scale assessment of the cover types burned in large fires, the relationship between prefire stand conditions and fire severity, and...
Author(s): John D. Shaw, Sara Goeking, James Menlove, Charles E. Werstak
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Biomass burning is an important source to the atmosphere of carbonaceous particulate matter that impacts air quality, climate, and human health. The semivolatile nature of directlyemitted organic particulate matter can result in particle evaporation as smoke plumes dilute. Further, oxidation of emitted and volatilized precursors can...
Author(s): Sonia M. Kreidenweis, Jeffrey R. Pierce
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Wildfire is a key factor influencing bird community composition in western North American forests. We need to understand species and community responses to wildfire and how responses vary regionally to effectively manage dry conifer forests for maintaining biodiversity. We compared avian relationships with wildfire burn severity...
Author(s): Quresh Latif, Jamie Sanderlin, Victoria A. Saab, William M. Block, Jonathan G. Dudley
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
With longer and more severe fire seasons predicted, the incidence and extent of fires are expected to increase in western North America. As more area is burned, past wildfires may influence the spread and burn severity of subsequent fires, with implications for ecosystem resilience and fire management. We examined how previous burn...
Author(s): Camille Stevens-Rumann, Susan J. Prichard, Eva K. Strand, Penelope Morgan
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Non-deforestation fire – i.e., fire that is typically followed by the recovery of natural vegetation – is arguably the most influential disturbance in terrestrial ecosystems, thereby playing a major role in carbon exchanges and affecting many climatic processes. The radiative effect from a given atmospheric CO2 perturbation is the...
Author(s): Jean-Sebastien Landry, H. Damon Matthews
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
There is a widespread view among land managers and others that the protected status of many forestlands in the western United States corresponds with higher fire severity levels due to historical restrictions on logging that contribute to greater amounts of biomass and fuel loading in less intensively managed areas, particularly...
Author(s): Curtis M. Bradley, Chad T. Hanson, Dominick A. DellaSala
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
High-intensity wildfires are one of the leading causes of severe soil erosion in western U.S. watersheds. This erosion can lead to disruptive deposits of sediment in reservoirs and water supply systems. Fuel treatments such as controlled burns and forest thinning can reduce wildfire intensity and help preserve topsoil. But while...
Author(s): Brian Cooke
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).