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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 2,200 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

190 results

Interest in PNW forests is shifting from a focus on old-growth forests alone to include the ecological value and processes of early-seral communities. However, focusing on the alpha and omega states of a linear successional model does not account for the suite of conditions derived from mixed-severity fire common in many forests....
Author(s): Christopher J. Dunn, John D. Bailey
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Historical and presettlement relationships between drought and wildfire have been well documented in much of North America, with forest fire occurrence and area burned clearly increasing in response to drought. Drought interacts with other controls (forest productivity, topography, and fire weather) to affect fire intensity and...
Author(s): Jeremy S. Littell, David L. Peterson, Karen L. Riley, Yongqiang Liu, Charles H. Luce
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Resilience in fire-prone forests is strongly affected by landscape burn-severity patterns, in part by governing propagule availability around stand-replacing patches in which all or most vegetation is killed. However, little is known about drivers of landscape patterns of stand-replacing fire, or whether...
Author(s): Brian J. Harvey, Daniel C. Donato, Monica G. Turner
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfires shape the distribution and structure of vegetation across the inland northwestern United States. However, fire activity is expected to increase given the current rate of climate change, with uncertain outcomes. A fire impact that has not been widely addressed is the development of unburned islands; areas within the fire...
Author(s): Arjan J. H. Meddens, Crystal A. Kolden, James A. Lutz
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Understanding the causes and consequences of rapid environmental change is an essential scientific frontier, particularly given the threat of climate- and land use-induced changes in disturbance regimes. In western North America, recent widespread insect outbreaks and wildfires have sparked acute concerns about potential insect–fire...
Author(s): Garrett W. Meigs, Harold S. Zald, John L. Campbell, William S. Keeton, Robert E. Kennedy
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The direct effects of climate change on alpine treeline ecotones – the transition zones between subalpine forest and non-forested alpine vegetation – have been studied extensively, but climate-induced changes in disturbance regimes have received less attention. To determine if recent increases in area burned extend to these higher-...
Author(s): C. Alina Cansler, Donald McKenzie, Charles B. Hansler
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
With longer and more severe fire seasons predicted, the incidence and extent of fires are expected to increase in western North America. As more area is burned, past wildfires may influence the spread and burn severity of subsequent fires, with implications for ecosystem resilience and fire management. We examined how previous burn...
Author(s): Camille Stevens-Rumann, Susan J. Prichard, Eva K. Strand, Penelope Morgan
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
There is a widespread view among land managers and others that the protected status of many forestlands in the western United States corresponds with higher fire severity levels due to historical restrictions on logging that contribute to greater amounts of biomass and fuel loading in less intensively managed areas, particularly...
Author(s): Curtis M. Bradley, Chad T. Hanson, Dominick A. DellaSala
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire regime characteristics in North America are expected to change over the next several decades as a result of anthropogenic climate change. Although some fire regime characteristics (e.g., area burned and fire season length) are relatively well-studied in the context of a changing climate, fire severity has received less...
Author(s): Sean A. Parks, Carol L. Miller, John T. Abatzoglou, Lisa M. Holsinger, Marc-Andre Parisien, Solomon Z. Dobrowski
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
We conducted bird surveys in 10 of the first 11 years following a mixed-severity fire in a dry, low-elevation mixed-conifer forest in western Montana, United States. By defining fire in terms of fire severity and time-since-fire, and then comparing detection rates for species inside 15 combinations of fire severity and time-since-...
Author(s): Richard L. Hutto, David A. Patterson
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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XLSResearch and Publications Database

These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).