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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 2,200 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

333 results

Spreading fires are noisy (and potentially chaotic) systems in which transitions in dynamics are notoriously difficult to predict. As flames move through spatially heterogeneous environments, sudden shifts in temperature, wind, or topography can generate combustion instabilities, or trigger self-stabilizing feedback loops, that...
Author(s): Jerome M. Fox, George M. Whitesides
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Theory suggests that natural fire regimes can result in landscapes that are both self-regulating and resilient to fire. For example, because fires consume fuel, they may create barriers to the spread of future fires, thereby regulating fire size. Top-down controls such as weather, however, can weaken this effect. While empirical...
Author(s): Sean A. Parks, Lisa M. Holsinger, Carol L. Miller, Cara R. Nelson
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Landscape fire succession models (LFSMs) predict spatially-explicit interactions between vegetation succession and disturbance, but these models have yet to fully integrate ungulate herbivory as a driver of their processes. We modified a complex LFSM, FireBGCv2, to include a multi-species herbivory module, GrazeBGC. The system is...
Author(s): Robert A. Riggs, Robert E. Keane, Norm Cimon, Rachel Cook, Lisa M. Holsinger, John Cook, Timothy DelCurto, Scott L. Baggett, Donald Justice, David Powell, Martin Vavra, Bridgett J. Naylor
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Modeling the behavior of crown fires is challenging due to the complex set of coupled processes that drive the characteristics of a spreading wildfire and the large range of spatial and temporal scales over which these processes occur. Detailed physics-based modeling approaches such as FIRETEC and the Wildland Urban Interface Fire...
Author(s): Chad M. Hoffman, J. Ziegler, Rodman Linn, William E. Mell, Carolyn Hull Sieg, F. Pimont
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Daily National Fire Danger Rating System (NFDRS) indices are typically associated with the number and final size of newly discovered fires, or averaged over time and associated with the likelihood and total burned area of large fires. Herein we used a decade (2003–12) of NFDRS indices and US Forest Service (USFS) fire reports to...
Author(s): Patrick H. Freeborn, Mark A. Cochrane, William Matt Jolly
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Climate strongly influences global wildfire activity, and recent wildfire surges may signal fire weather-induced pyrogeographic shifts. Here we use three daily global climate data sets and three fire danger indices to develop a simple annual metric of fire weather season length, and map spatio-temporal trends from 1979 to 2013. We...
Author(s): William Matt Jolly, Mark A. Cochrane, Patrick H. Freeborn, Zachary A. Holden, Timothy J. Brown, G.J. Williamson, David M. J. S. Bowman
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Large wildfires of increasing frequency and severity threaten local populations and natural resources and contribute carbon emissions into the earth-climate system. Although wildfires have been researched and modeled for decades, no verifiable physical theory of spread is available to form the basis for the precise predictions...
Author(s): Mark A. Finney, Jack D. Cohen, Jason M. Forthofer, Sara S. McAllister, Michael J. Gollner, Daniel J. Gorham, Kozo Saito, Nelson K. Akafuah, Brittany A. Adam, Justin D. English
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Very large wildfires can cause significant economic and environmental damage, including destruction of homes, adverse air quality, firefighting costs and even loss of life. We examine how climate is associated with very large wildland fires (VLWFs > or =50,000 acres, or ~20,234 ha) in the western contiguous USA. We used composite...
Author(s): E. Natasha Stavros, John T. Abatzoglou, Narasimhan K. Larkin, Donald McKenzie, E. Ashley Steel
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Comprehensive assessment of ecological change after fires have burned forests and rangelands is important if we are to understand, predict and measure fire effects. We highlight the challenges in effective assessment of fire and burn severity in the field and using both remote sensing and simulation models. We draw on diverse recent...
Author(s): Penelope Morgan, Robert E. Keane, Gregory K. Dillon, Theresa B. Jain, Andrew T. Hudak, Eva C. Karau, Pamela G. Sikkink, Zachary A. Holden, Eva K. Strand
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Synthesis
Live fuel moisture content (LFMC), the ratio of water mass to dry mass contained in live plant material, is an important fuel property for determining fire danger and for modeling fire behavior. Remote sensing estimation of LFMC often relies on an assumption of changing water and stable dry mass over time. Fundamental understanding...
Author(s): Yi Qi, Philip E. Dennison, William Matt Jolly, Rachel C. Kropp, Simon C. Brewer
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).