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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 2,200 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

346 results

Mastication is a wildland fuel treatment technique that is rapidly becoming popular with fire managers for fire hazard reduction projects, especially in areas where reducing fuels with prescribed fire is particularly challenging. Mastication is the process of mechanically modifying the live and dead surface and canopy biomass by...
Author(s): Robert E. Keane, Pamela G. Sikkink, Theresa B. Jain, James J. Reardon
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Biomass burning is an important source to the atmosphere of carbonaceous particulate matter that impacts air quality, climate, and human health. The semivolatile nature of directlyemitted organic particulate matter can result in particle evaporation as smoke plumes dilute. Further, oxidation of emitted and volatilized precursors can...
Author(s): Sonia M. Kreidenweis, Jeffrey R. Pierce
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Wood cribs are often used as ignition sources for room fire tests. A wood crib may also apply to studies of burning rate in wildland fires, because wildland fuel beds are porous and three dimensional. A unique aspect of wildland fires is the ubiquitous presence of wind. However, very little is known about what effect the increased...
Author(s): Sara S. McAllister, Mark A. Finney
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
We present a case study of the Las Conchas Fire (2011) to explore the role of previously burned areas (wildfires and prescribed fires) on suppression effectiveness and avoided exposure. Methodological innovations include characterisation of the joint dynamics of fire growth and suppression activities, development of a fire line...
Author(s): Matthew P. Thompson, Patrick H. Freeborn, Jon D. Rieck, David E. Calkin, Julie W. Gilbertson-Day, Mark A. Cochrane, Michael S. Hand
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Bark beetle-caused tree mortality and its effect on both the fuels complex and potential fire behavior in affected forests, particularly lodgepole pine forests, has been a topic of much debate in recent years (Hicke et al. 2012; Jenkins et al. 2012; Black et al. 2013). Early research on the subject seemed to suggest a...
Author(s): Michael J. Jenkins, Justin B. Runyon, Martin E. Alexander, Wesley G. Page, Andrew Guinta
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Characterising radiation from wildland fires is an important focus of fire science because radiation relates directly to the combustion process and can be measured across a wide range of spatial extents and resolutions. As part of a more comprehensive set of measurements collected during the 2012 Prescribed Fire Combustion and...
Author(s): Matthew B. Dickinson, Andrew T. Hudak, Thomas J. Zajkowski, E. Louise Loudermilk, Wilfrid Schroeder, Luke Ellison, Robert L. Kremens, William Holley, Otto Martinez, Alexander Paxton, Benjamin C. Bright, Joseph J. O'Brien, Benjamin Hornsby, Charles Ichoku, Jason Faulring, Aaron Gerace, David L. Peterson, Joseph Mauceri
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Mastication of shrubs and small trees to reduce fire hazard has become a widespread management practice, yet many aspects of the fire behaviour of these unique woody fuelbeds remain poorly understood. To examine the effects of fuelbed aging on fire behaviour, we conducted laboratory burns with masticated Arctostaphylos spp. and...
Author(s): Jesse K. Kreye, J. Morgan Varner, Jeffrey M. Kane, Eric E. Knapp, Warren P. Reed
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildland fires, especially wildfires, are not commonly thought of as fuel treatments; however, because fires consume fuels and alter vegetation structure, they can serve as fuel treatments similar to more traditional means (e.g., mechanical or prescribed fire). To consider previously burned areas when managing subsequent fires,...
Author(s): Sean A. Parks, Corey L. Gucker
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
The National Wildfire Coordinating Group’s definition of extreme fire behavior indicates a level of fire behavior characteristics that ordinarily precludes methods of direct control action. One or more of the following is usually involved: high rate of spread, prolific crowning/ spotting, presence of fire whirls, and strong...
Author(s): Paul A. Werth, Brian E. Potter, Martin E. Alexander, Miguel G. Cruz, Craig B. Clements, Mark A. Finney, Jason M. Forthofer, Scott L. Goodrick, Chad M. Hoffman, William Matt Jolly, Sara S. McAllister, Roger D. Ottmar, Russell A. Parsons
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Synthesis, Technical Report or White Paper
A lengthening of the fire season, coupled with higher temperatures, increases the probability of fires throughout much of western North America. Although regional variation in the frequency of fires is well established, attempts to predict the occurrence of fire at a spatial resolution <10 km2 have generally been unsuccessful. We...
Author(s): Richard H. Waring, Nicholas C. Coops
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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XLSResearch and Publications Database

These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).