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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 2,900 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

879 results

The invasive annual grass Bromus tectorum (cheatgrass) forms a positive feedback with fire in some areas of western North America's sagebrush biome by increasing fire frequency and size, which then increases B. tectorum abundance post-fire and dramatically alters ecosystem structure and processes. However, this positive response to...
Author(s): Kimberly Taylor, Tyler Brummer, Lisa J. Rew, Matt Lavin, Bruce D. Maxwell
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The final webinar in the Future Forest Webinar Series provided an example of how managers utilized available science to address questions about post-epidemic forest conditions. Assessments of current conditions and projected trends, and how these compare with historical patterns, provide important information for land management...
Author(s): Claudia Regan, Barry Bollenbacher, Rob Gump, Michael Hillis
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
Dr. Dick Hutto, professor of Organismal Biology and Ecology at the University of Montana, took participants of the May 2014 Large Wildland Fires Conference to recently burned sites to discuss fire effects. Hutto was enthused and excited about “the magical biology” occurring on recently burned sites. Magical biology includes...
Author(s): Corey L. Gucker
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
There is limited information about the effects of cattle grazing to longer-term plant community composition and herbage production following fire in sagebrush steppe. This study evaluated vegetation response to cattle grazing over 7 yr (2007-2013) on burned Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis [Beetle &...
Author(s): Jonathan D. Bates, Kirk W. Davies
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Insect outbreaks are often assumed to increase the severity or probability of fire occurrence through increased fuel availability, while fires may in turn alter susceptibility of forests to subsequent insect outbreaks through changes in the spatial distribution of suitable host trees. However, little is actually known about the...
Author(s): Aquila Flower, Daniel G. Gavin, Emily K. Heyerdahl, Russell A. Parsons, Greg M. Cohn
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Recent work has demonstrated that evolutionary processes shape ecological dynamics on relatively short timescales (eco-evolutionary dynamics), but demonstrating these effects at large spatial scales in natural landscapes has proven difficult. We used empirical studies and modeling to investigate how selective pressures from fire and...
Author(s): Matt V. Talluto, Craig W. Benkman
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Bark beetle-caused tree mortality affects important forest ecosystem processes. Remote sensing methodologies that quantify live and dead basal area (BA) in bark beetle-affected forests can provide valuable information to forest managers and researchers. We compared the utility of light detection and ranging (lidar) and the Landsat-...
Author(s): Benjamin C. Bright, Andrew T. Hudak, Robert E. Kennedy, Arjan J. H. Meddens
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The ecological effects of forest fires burning with high severity are long-lived and have the greatest impact on vegetation successional trajectories, as compared to low-to-moderate severity fires. The primary drivers of high severity fire are unclear, but it has been hypothesized that wind-driven, large fire-growth days play a...
Author(s): Donovan Birch, Penelope Morgan, Crystal A. Kolden, Andrew T. Hudak, Alistair M. S. Smith
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Both satellite imagery and spatial fire effects models are valuable tools for generating burn severity maps that are useful to fire scientists and resource managers. The purpose of this study was to test a new mapping approach that integrates imagery and modeling to create more accurate burn severity maps. We developed and assessed...
Author(s): Eva C. Karau, Pamela G. Sikkink, Robert E. Keane, Gregory K. Dillon
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
BackgroundandAims: Resin ducts (RDs) are features present in most conifer species as defence structures against pests and pathogens; however, little is known about RD expression in trees following fire injury. This study investigates changes in RD size and density in fire scars of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and western...
Author(s): Estelle Arbellay, Markus Stoffel, Elaine Kennedy Sutherland, Kevin T. Smith, Donald A. Falk
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

Pages

XLSResearch and Publications Database

These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).