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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 2,200 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

453 results

Interannual variability in burn severity is assessed across forested ecoregions of the western United States to understand how it is influenced by variations in area burned and climate during 1984–2014. Strong correlations (|r| > 0.6) between annual area burned and climate metrics were found across many of the studied regions....
Author(s): John T. Abatzoglou, Crystal A. Kolden, A. Park Williams, James A. Lutz, Alistair M. S. Smith
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The economic and ecological costs of wildfire in the United States have risen substantially in recent decades. Although climate change has likely enabled a portion of the increase in wildfire activity, the direct role of people in increasing wildfire activity has been largely overlooked. We evaluate over 1.5 million government...
Author(s): Jennifer Balch, Bethany A. Bradley, John T. Abatzoglou, R. Chelsea Nagy, Emily J. Fusco, Adam L. Mahood
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The effect of topography on wildfire distribution in the Canadian Rockies has been the subject of debate. We suspect the size of the study area, and the assumption fire return intervals are distributed as a Weibull distribution used in many previous studies may have obscured the real effect of topography on these fire-regulated...
Author(s): Marie-Pierre Rogeau, Glen W. Armstrong
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Human-caused wildfires are controlled by human and natural influences, and determining their key drivers is critical for understanding spatial patterns of wildfire and implementing effective fire management. We examined an array of explanatory variables that account for spatial controls of human-caused fire occurrence from 1990 to...
Author(s): Philip E. Camp, Meg A. Krawchuk
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Tree-age data in combination with fire scars improved inverse-distance-weighted spatial modelling of historical fire boundaries and intervals for the Darkwoods, British Columbia, Canada. Fire-scarred trees provided direct evidence of fire. The presence of fire-sensitive trees at sites with no fire scars indicated fire-free periods...
Author(s): Gregory A. Greene, Lori D. Daniels
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Current phylogenetic evidence shows that fire began shaping the evolution of land plants 125 Ma, although the fossil charcoal record indicates that fire has a much longer history (>350 Ma). Serotiny (on-plant seed storage) is generally accepted as an adaptation to fire among woody plants. We developed a conceptual model of the...
Author(s): Tianhua He, Claire M. Belcher, Byron B. Lamont, Sim L. Lim
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Every year wildland fires affect much more acreage in the United States compared to controlled burns. Like controlled burns, wildland fire can help promote biological diversity and healthy ecosystems. But despite these facts, wildland fire is not often considered as a fuel treatment in the United States. Scientists working with the...
Author(s): Brian Cooke
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
In heterogeneous forest landscapes prone to wildfires, accurate classification of the fire regime beyond direct observations and records is difficult. This is in part due to the methods used to reconstruct historical fires in complex, heterogeneous landscapes with varying fire severities. Mixed-severity fire regimes, defined as...
Author(s): Vanessa Stretch, Ze'ev Gedalof, Jacklyn Cockburn, Michael F. Pisaric
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Several aspects of wildland fire are moderated by site- and landscape-level vegetation changes caused by previous fire, thereby creating a dynamic where one fire exerts a regulatory control on subsequent fire. For example, wildland fire has been shown to regulate the size and severity of subsequent fire. However, wildland fire has...
Author(s): Sean A. Parks, Carol L. Miller, Lisa M. Holsinger, Scott L. Baggett, Benjamin J. Bird
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Like many fire-adapted ecosystems, decades of fire exclusion policy in the Rocky Mountains and Foothills natural regions of southern Alberta, Canada are raising concern over the loss of ecological integrity. Departure from historical conditions is evaluated using median fire return intervals (MdFRI) based on fire history data from...
Author(s): Michael D. Flannigan, Brad C. Hawkes, Marc-Andre Parisien, Marie-Pierre Rogeau, Rick Arthur
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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