Author(s):
Michael J. Dockry, Serra Hoagland, Adrian Leighton, Jim Durglo, Amit Pradhananga
Year Published:

Cataloging Information

Topic(s):
Fire & Traditional Knowledge

Record updated: October 26, 2022
NRFSN number: 24830

Native American and Alaska Native tribes manage millions of acres of land and are leaders in forestry and fire management practices despite inadequate and inequitable funding. Native American tribes are rarely considered as research partners due to historically poor relationships with non-native scientists, tribal mistrust of research, differences between Indigenous values and scientific methods, and low Indigenous representation at research institutions. Understanding tribal research needs is critical to foster successful research partnerships with underserved tribal communities. This study expands on a 2011 tribal research needs assessment with a survey to identify tribal natural resource professionals’ research needs, access to research findings, and interest in participating in research. Information needs identified in our survey includes forest health, water quality, culturally significant species, workforce and tribal youth development, cultural importance of water, and invasive species. Additionally, postfire response and valuation, resilience and long-term forestry, protecting and curating tribal data, and Indigenous burning were more important research needs for tribal members than for nontribal members. This study can inform forestry research planning efforts and establish ­research priorities and collaborations that are aligned with needs identified by tribal natural resource managers.

Study Implications: There is a growing desire to broaden forestry research to support tribal forest management. This study shows that tribal research priorities include forest health, water quality, culturally significant species, workforce development/training, tribal youth development, cultural importance of water, and invasive species. Additionally, postfire response and valuation, resilience and long-term forestry, protecting and curating tribal data, and Indigenous burning were ranked of higher importance by tribal members than nontribal members. This study can inform federal research entities, universities, and natural resource management agencies in planning and establishing research priorities that are aligned with the needs identified by tribal resource managers

Citation

Dockry MJ, Hoagland SJ, Leighton AD, Durglo JR, and Pradhananga A. 2022. An Assessment of American Indian Forestry Research, Information Needs, and Priorities. Journal of Forestry, fvac030, https://doi.org/10.1093/jofore/fvac030

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